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Mirtazapine racemate2
Mirtazapine racemate2
Synonyms 6-azamianserin and Org-3770
racemate2.html Brand names Avanza, Axit, Remeron and others
IUPAC name

IUPAC name
2-methyl-1,2,3,4,10,14b-hexahydropyrazino[2,1-a]pyrido[2,3-c][2]benzazepine
ChemSpider

4060

DrugBank

DB00370

PubChem

4205

PDB fields

N/A

Formula

C17H19N3

InChI
InChI
1S/C17H19N3/c1-19-9-10-20-16(12-19)15-7-3-2-5-13(15)11-14-6-4-8-18-17(14)20/h2-8,16H,9-12H2,1H3
InChIKey
InChIKey
RONZAEMNMFQXRA-UHFFFAOYSA-N
SMILES
SMILES
CN1CCN2C(C1)C1=CC=CC=C1CC1=C2N=CC=C1
(Jmol 3D structure)
Mol. mass

265.3529 g/mol

Mirtazapine is an atypical antidepressant that is mostly used to treat major depression and select anxiety disorders (such as OCD, PTSD and panic disorders); it was first tried in amfetamine addiction due to the fact that in laboratory animals it was capable of attenuating addictive behaviours. This is likely partly due to the fact that the α2 (an adrenaline/noradrenaline receptor) and 5-HT2C (a serotonin receptor) receptors that mirtazapine blocks also inhibit the release of noradrenaline and dopamine in certain areas of the brain; hence mirtazapine may relieve some of the withdrawal effects from stimulant addiction. Whereas the 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors that mirtazapine blocks likely contribute by reversing some of the changes that occur in the human brain after drug use and that seem to be involved in addiction.[1]

Its principal side effects are related to its antihistamine effects such as drowsiness (which usually goes away with repeated administration) and weight gain and its anticholinergic effects such as dry mouth and constipation. While safer than bupropion in overdose, it is slightly more toxic than SSRIs in overdose.[2][3]

StructuresEdit

Mirtazapine racemate2
(R)-mirtazapine
(S)-mirtazapine
220px (R)-mirtazapine
200px (S)-mirtazapine



External linksEdit

Reference listEdit

  1. Graves, SM; Rafeyan, R; Watts, J; Napier, TC (December 2012). "Mirtazapine, and mirtazapine-like compounds as possible pharmacotherapy for substance abuse disorders: evidence from the bench and the bedside.". Pharmacology & Therapeutics 136 (3): 343–53. PMC 3483434. PMID 22960395. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2012.08.013. 
  2. Hawton, K; Bergen, H; Simkin, S; Cooper, J; Waters, K; Gunnell, D; Kapur, N (May 2010). "Toxicity of antidepressants: rates of suicide relative to prescribing and non-fatal overdose.". The British Journal of Psychiatry 196 (5): 354–8. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.109.070219. PMC 2862059. PMID 20435959.
  3. White, N; Litovitz, T; Clancy, C (December 2008). "Suicidal antidepressant overdoses: a comparative analysis by antidepressant type.". Journal of Medical Toxicology 4 (4): 238–50. doi:10.1007/BF03161207. PMC 3550116. PMID 19031375.

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