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Atopic dermatitis
Synonyms
Synonyms
AD, Eczema
MeSH D003876
ICD-9

691.8

ICD-10

L20

eMedicine

Overview
Presentation
DDx
Workup
Treatment
Medication}

MedlinePlus

000853

Patient.co.uk

Professional Reference
Patient Reference

OMIM

603165

BHC

Atopic dermatitis

Wikipedia

Atopic dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a relapsing-remitting inflammatory skin disorder characterized by intensely itchy skin lesions (which are usually red and raised) that occur predominantly in the folds of the elbows and knees, along with the face and neck (for infants).[1] Affected individuals frequently have dry skin, and many treatments for less severe cases of the disorder focus on correcting this abnormality.[2] It is believed to have a strong genetic component[note 1][1] and frequently occurs concomitantly with asthma and allergies.[2] Like these conditions it is also associated with IgE abnormalities, namely high IgE levels in the plasma and is believed to be a predominantly T cell (especially TH2)-mediated pathology.[1][2][3] It is a fairly component condition with about 15-20% of school-aged children and 2-10% of adults having the disorder.[2]

Cases unresponsive to the aforementioned moisturizing of the dry skin associated with AD may be treated with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors (e.g., pimecrolimus or tacrolimus); if this fails or is unsuitable (e.g., due to poor patient compliance) systemic immunosuppressants like calcineurin inhibitors, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate may be useful.[3]


External linksEdit

NotesEdit

  1. e.g., >80% of kids with two AD-affected parents will develop the disorder

Reference listEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Longo, DL; Fauci, AS; Kasper, DL; Hauser, SL; Jameson, JL; Loscalzo, J, ed. (2012). "Chapter 52. Eczema, Psoriasis, Cutaneous Infections, Acne, and Other Common Skin Disorders". Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18e. New York, USA: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07174889-6. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Tidy, C (18 February 2011). "Atopic Dermatitis and Eczema". Patient.co.uk Professional Reference. Green Lane, UK: Egton Medical Information Systems Limited. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Simon, D; Bieber, T (January 2014). "Systemic therapy for atopic dermatitis.". Allergy 69 (1): 46–55. PMID 24354911. doi:10.1111/all.12339. 

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